DANDELION SALAD – Health and Nutrition Benefits

1348

Eat Your Weeds!

A favorite salad from a favorite store, is dandelion salad from Whole Foods Market’s Recipes.

Easy to make and rich in vitamins and minerals, dandelion greens are also relatively inexpensive yet pack a powerful anti-oxidant punch for strengthening the immune system.  A virtual pharmacopeial treasure chest, dandelions are known as a digestive-supporting herb.  They increase bile flow in the liver, which promotes digestion of fats and absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, K and E.

Dandelion leaves, flowers and even the roots have been used for centuries in herbal teas as a medicinal plant.  Today, dandelion parts turn up in coffee substitutes, and even wine. Dandelions are rich in the minerals potassium, iron, calcium and magnesium.  They contain nature’s highest level of vitamin A, as well as many B vitamins important for energy metabolism.  As with all vegetables, they are a great source of fiber.

Dandelion Benefits

Dandelion roots, leaves and flowers have been used for centuries for food and medicine. Brought to North America by our European ancestors and used for centuries by Native Americans as well as in traditional Chinese medicine, the entire plant is useful for numerous ailments. was used in remedies for fever, boils, eye problems, diabetes, and diarrhea.

We use dandelion as an effective liver and detox tea.

Plant Description

Hundreds of species of dandelion grow in the temperate regions of Europe, Asia, and North America. Dandelion is a hardy perennial that can grow to a height of nearly 12 inches. The plants have deeply-notched, toothy, spatula-like leaves that are shiny and hairless. Dandelion stems are capped by bright yellow flowers. The grooved leaves funnel rain to the root.

Dandelion flowers open with the sun in the morning and close in the evening or during gloomy weather. The dark brown roots are fleshy and brittle and are filled with a white milky substance that is bitter and slightly smelly.

Parts Used

Dandelion leaves act as a diuretic, increasing the amount of urine your body makes. The leaves are used to stimulate the appetite and help digestion. Dandelion flower has antioxidant properties. Dandelion may also help improve the immune system.

Herbalists use dandelion root to detoxify the liver and gallbladder, and dandelion leaves to help kidney function.

Medicinal Uses and Indications

Most scientific studies of dandelion have been in animals, not people. Traditionally, dandelion has been used as a diuretic, to increase the amount of urine and eliminate fluid in your body. It has been used for many conditions where a diuretic might help, such as liver problems and high blood pressure. However, there is no good research on using dandelion as a diuretic in people.

Fresh or dried dandelion herb is also used as a mild appetite stimulant, and to improve upset stomach. The root of the dandelion plant may act as a mild laxative and has been used to improve digestion. Preliminary research suggests that dandelion may help improve liver and gallbladder function. But this study was not well designed.

Preliminary animal studies suggest that dandelion may help normalize blood sugar levels and lower total cholesterol and triglycerides while raising HDL (good) cholesterol in diabetic mice. But not all the animal studies have found a positive effect on blood sugar. Researchers need to see if dandelion will work in people.

A few animal studies also suggest that dandelion might help fight inflammation.

Available Forms

You can find dandelion herbs and roots fresh or dried in a variety of forms, including tinctures, liquid extract, teas, tablets, and capsules. Dandelion can be found alone or combined with other dietary supplements.

For safety, always ask your doctor before giving supplements to a child of taking them yourself.

 

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. However, herbs can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs under the supervision of a health care provider.

Dandelion is generally considered safe. Some people may have an allergic reaction from touching dandelion. Others may get mouth sores.

If you are allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion.

In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin.

People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion.

Possible Interactions

Dandelion leaf may act as a diuretic, which can make drugs leave your body faster. It also interacts with a number of medications that are broken down by the liver. If you are taking prescription medications, ask your doctor before taking dandelion leaf.1)http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/dandelion

 

Dandelion Greens with Warm Balsamic Vinaigrette

Serves 6 to 8

Make sure to serve these dandelion greens right after tossing them in the warm garlic-infused vinaigrette.

Ingredients
2 1/2 pounds dandelion greens
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1/4 cup hazelnuts, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste

Method
Trim off thickest part of the stems and discard along with any tough leaves. Roughly chop remaining greens and transfer to a large salad bowl.

Heat oil in a small heavy skillet over low heat. Add garlic and hazelnuts and cook, stirring frequently, until garlic is golden. Stir in vinegar and salt and pepper.

Pour hot vinaigrette over greens and toss to combine. Serve immediately.

Nutrition
Per Serving (174g-wt.): 140 calories (70 from fat), 8g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 5g protein, 16g total carbohydrate (6g dietary fiber, 7g sugar), 0mg cholesterol, 290mg sodium2)http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/recipe.php?recipeId=681

If you’re interested in gardening, you may be interested in this article on other garden and yard “weeds” you can eat, from GardensAll.com.3)http://gardensall.com/when-weeds-happen-eat-em/

For info on dandelion tea, you may enjoy this article.4)http://mytrainerfitness.com/teas-for-health-healing-and-detox/

If you like gardening you might consider growing your own dandelion greens. I know. Sounds weird when many people are working hard to kill the dandelions in their yards. But… we would never think to get rid of highly beneficial nutritional supplements, right? So… same thing with those dandelions. So… if you like gardening, you may be interested in this article on growing dandelions.5)https://www.gardensall.com/dandelions-to-eat-grow-sell-and-heal/

DISCLAIMER:
We’ve provided this special diet and nutritional information for educational purposes. But remember — we’re not doctors and this is information, not professional advice! You should follow the advice of your health-care provider. And since product formulations change, check product labels for the most recent ingredient information.

Here’s that recipe in another format, should it be easier for you to download:

Dandelion Greens With Warm Balsamic Vinaigrette
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 5-10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 5-10 minutes
Dandelion Greens With Warm Balsamic Vinaigrette
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 5-10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 5-10 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. Cut top 5 inches from greens and reserve leaves. Cut remaining greens into 3/4-inch slices. Transfer to large salad bowl. Then add freshly boiled eggs, and feta.
  2. For the dressing in a small heavy skillet saute garlic and nuts in oil, (Do not BOIL, boiled oil is highly toxic.) on the lowest heat, stirring until garlic is golden. Stir in vinegar, salt, and pepper.
  3. Pour hot vinagrette over greens and toss to combine.
Recipe Notes

Share this Recipe
 
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

References   [ + ]